We're headed to Iraq

You can be a participant in this story. 

100cameras has received a special invitation to implement our next flagship project in IDP camps in Northern Iraq-Kurdistan this Fall. We are humbled at the opportunity to utilize our custom storytelling curriculum to empower kids to process and embrace their stories, learn that their perspectives matter, and to realize that they can create change. 

For kids that may find it difficult to use words, our model is built on using photography as a powerful tool for self-expression, healing, and ownership of the stories of their individual lives and those of their communities. We urge you to learn more and invite you join alongside us.

Images taken in IDP camps located in Iraq-Kurdistan by photographer & friend of ours, Moo Jae

BTS with Snapshot Project: Brazil

Snapshot Project Brazil was led by the talented Scott Bennett, a Spanish professor and photographer from San Diego, CA. His vision for this 100cameras Snapshot Project was to see local youth learn photography and engage in creative expression as a means to grow both personally and professionally in the neighborhood of Morro da Providência, a favela in Rio. Scott has a deep passion for photography, teaching, and Brazilian culture as he lived and worked in Brazil as a volunteer for extended periods of time. Prior to leading a Snapshot, Scott already spent time in the Providência neighborhood in Rio, and was excited to give back to the community through this project.

We are excited to take you through this Snapshot Project experience through the writings and updates that Scott shared with his friends, family, colleagues, and supporters throughout the project. Thank you, Scott, for sharing your talent and experience!

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REFLECTIONS: 

It was our first class meeting for the 100cameras Snapshot Project in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This collaboration between 100cameras and French artist JR’s nonprofit CoFondation will be a month-long course on photography and storytelling that gives the youth involved a chance to give back to their own community through creative expression. Today, we learned about the 100cameras model and how the group is now connected with other students around the world. We also learned about camera basics, and what it means to have a personal voice in creative expression. We then went out to do a “Photo Scavenger Hunt” to start taking photos. It was wonderful to see the group start taking photos and exploring the neighborhood in search of the items on their list. The students will be taking more photos over the next few days, and they have a written assignment for their journals as well. 

During our second class meeting, we reviewed the prior lesson and then also learned about composition basics, such as telling a story in the frame, point of view, leading lines, vanishing point, having a clear subject, symmetry and patterns, the rule of thirds etc. We looked at some examples of master photographers and discussed some of the techniques. We then went out to do a “Photo Scavenger Hunt” to take photos and practice with some of the composition techniques we learned in class. It was wonderful to see the group taking photos and exploring the neighborhood in search of the items on their list. The students will be taking more photos over the next few days, and they have a written assignment for their journals as well. There was much more content in our second class, so it is really stretching the students’ minds some! 

Our third class for the 100cameras Snapshot Project in Rio was a success! We reviewed some composition techniques, and we are now learning about framing, emotion, exposure, motion, and telling a story with photos. I have been impressed with the improvement in photos in only three classes, and I’m sure that the students will continue to get better as they practice and learn. At first they were very interested in checking out the cameras, and taking a few photos…but now they are actually thinking about the photo that they want to make before doing it!  

Our fifth class meeting for the @100cameras Snapshot Project in Rio was a bit different! My friend Malvina Sosnovsky is a professional musician from Switzerland who plays the violin (she did some volunteer work with kids while she was in Brazil as well). She did a mini concert for my photo class, and they were simply amazed! I asked her to come share her talents so that my photo students could hear her music and also get inspired to take photos. The joy on the kids faces was nothing less than incredible…a bit of amazement and laughter together with, wow! After, our group went out on a field trip to take photos at Praça Mauá and around the port of Rio. I am looking forward to seeing the shots from the group!

Our sixth and seventh class focused on taking portraits and shooting photos of other people in the community! We also spent time going through all of the photos that the group has taken up to this point in order to do a quick edit for the upcoming exhibition at Casa Amarela. It was great to see how far the group has come since the very first day (and how many photos they had to choose from for the edit). We will eventually get the very best photos for the exhibition, but this first step was a collaborative process in just choosing photos that would make the first cut. It was great seeing them praise and say no to both their own photos and the other members of the class. Having the students be aware that some of the photos they choose will eventually be sold on the website and the funds raised will go directly to their own community is an empowering thought! I really loved it when they said…that photo is great, but I don’t think anyone would buy it! It just shows how much their critical eye has grown over the past month!

Upon completion of the course, we had the final exhibition for the 100cameras Snapshot Project class. After curating, editing and printing the 26 photos for the exhibit, the preparations were under way! First, the smaller children participated in the exhibit by making custom painted and glittered clips to hang the photos, and they also made some beautiful invitations for the people in the community of Morro da Providência in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For the exhibit, we decided to hang the photos on a string with clips. After cleaning and preparing the room, we also had music and some food for the celebration.

The best part of the exhibition was having each student from the 100cameras class sign their photos and then hang them. I told them that since they are artists, an artist needs to sign the work that they do. For most of them, this was the first time that they experienced such an event. Not only did we share the photos with the community, listen to music, and eat some wonderful food, the participants also received a certificate stating that they finished the 100cameras Snapshot Project. Everyone had a great time, and the students were very proud of their work…as they should be! Thanks again to all of the supporters who helped make this happen, and also to everyone at Casa Amarela who prepared the exhibit. Art is not only necessary to grow creatively and intellectually, but it also is just good for the soul to see photos by members of the neighborhood share their perspective and reality for everyone to see! Congratulations!

CLICK TO LEARN MORE AND PURCHASE IMAGES:

Inaugural 100cameras Gala

Thank you to everyone who joined us at our inaugural spring gala!
 

What a night! We were thrilled to celebrate the mission of 100cameras together as we looked ahead into all that is to come with scaling our impact this year. It was an evening to remember as we sold out with 350 individuals in attendance and raised $37,000 to directly further our projects worldwide.

We hope you will follow along our exciting journey in 2017 as we launch up to 12 new Snapshot Projects globally in partnership with ONA as well as serve 120 kids through our Flagship Project happening this fall (Location announcement coming soon). This means that we are on track to empower 300+ kids this year alone! For updates and stories from the field, be sure follow our social channels.

To help recap all the fun of our inaugural gala, we are offering a live recording of the evening thanks to our DJ, Anthony Batista. We hope this mix will take you happily into summer during your work commute, when you need motivation at the gym, or for your next dinner turned dance party. You can find and enjoy the playlist here.

With great anticipation and hope for all to come, we are truly thankful for your support!

 
 

THE EVENING WAS MADE POSSIBLE BY:

The Inspiration Behind World Perspective Day

Inspired by our mission, World Perspective Day is a movement.

100cameras is a 501c3 non-profit organization based in New York City that teaches kids around the world that their stories matter and helps them explore their narratives in the larger context of a global world. We teach our students how to share their perspectives through photography and then sell their images, empowering them to provide much needed educational, lifeline, and medical supplies for themselves and other community members. We have completed projects across the globe and have recently launched our Snapshot Project platform that equips photographers worldwide to implement their own project with a community they care about.

Our entire mission is founded upon the power of perspective. We empower kids around the world with the opportunity to learn that their stories matter and to help explore their narratives in the larger context of a global world. We teach our students how to share their perspectives through photography and then sell their images, empowering them to provide much needed educational, lifeline, and medical supplies for themselves and other community members. We have completed projects across the globe and have recently launched our Snapshot Project platform that equips photographers worldwide to implement their own project with a community they care about.

World Perspective Day was inspired directly from our students as they have become our teachers in so many ways.

You see, the students we work with have all survived traumatic injustices, yet, they still seem to embrace life through the wonderment and awe that is seemingly found only through a kid's lens. Through both writing and teaching our unique photojournalism course, our souls have been forever changed and awakened by watching kids not only embrace learning how to share their perspectives but dive into the depths of processing who they are because of all they've learned from their past and expressing their hope for who they want to be in their future.

Our students have taught us to recognize that the context of our narrative is woven into a larger thread. And that when we can each allow our perspectives to choose hope in our interactions instead of being gripped by the fears that can overwhelm or divide us, we can reach our full potential as an individual and as a human race.

We have been humbled as these students continually teach us how to embrace that their narrative isn't defined by their current circumstances or how others may define them. Instead, they choose to recognize and accept that they are a part of a larger context and their role in the bigger picture is integral. They accept that their perspective may be unique and different -- and that is not only okay, it is necessary and outstanding. This gives them great freedom to lean into the thought -- the hope -- that they can be a part of the greater good at large.

We believe in the great hope for what can happen when an individual is empowered to create something that provides hope for themselves and others. Over and over again, almost everyone we have met traveling and in the field has just wanted to tell us their story – to share their narratives, filled with pieces about their families, their long days of work (or why they couldn’t get work), their likes and dislikes, where they’d been, and where they wanted to go. Each story we have ever heard along the way in our individual journeys is important. It has felt as though the storytellers were sharing it with us in hopes that we would share it with someone else.

It gripped us early on to realize that each person on earth has always had a story to tell, and they have always had voices to share them – they just perhaps haven’t had the platform to be heard outside of their concentric circles or to participate in the global narrative.

Our team has committed to being merely a band of participants that join alongside others by bringing an opportunity to share their perspectives alongside a community of individuals.

This has awakened us. This model of empowerment has not only changed our students' lives, but ours as well.

Snapshot Project Update : Rio, Brazil

Behind-the-scenes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil with Snapshot Project Leader, Scott Bennett.
All images credited to Scott Bennett and Snapshot Project: Rio, Brazil

All images credited to Scott Bennett and Snapshot Project: Rio, Brazil

This collaboration between 100cameras and French artist JR’s nonprofit, CoFondation, will be a month-long course on photography and storytelling that gives the youth involved a chance to give back to their own community through creative expression.

Connect with Scott on Instagram, Twitter, and Tumblr to follow along and see updates from the field in real-time. To learn more about this project and how you can get directly involved, click HERE

Read on as Scott shares experiences from the first three classes directly from the field below:

LESSON ONE:

Today, we learned about the 100cameras model and how the group is now connected with other 100cameras students around the world. We also learned about camera basics, and what it means to have a personal voice in creative expression. We then went out to do a “Photo Scavenger Hunt” to start taking photos. It was wonderful to see the group start taking photos and exploring the neighborhood in search of the items on their list. The students will be taking more photos over the next few days, and they have a written assignment for their journals as well. 

LESSON TWO:

First, we reviewed about the 100cameras model and how the group is now connected with other 100cameras students around the world. We also learned about composition basics, such as telling a story in the frame, point of view, leading lines, vanishing point, having a clear subject, symmetry and patterns, the rule of thirds etc. We looked at some examples of master photographers and discussed some of the techniques. We then went out to do a “Photo Scavenger Hunt” to take photos and practice with some of the composition techniques we learned in class. It was wonderful to see the group taking photos and exploring the neighborhood in search of the items on their list. The students will be taking more photos over the next few days, and they have a written assignment for their journals as well. For all of the supporters who donated to make this happen, I just want to let you know that the second day was a success! There was much more content in our second class, so it is really stretching the students’ minds some! 

LESSON THREE:

Our third class for the 100cameras Snapshot Project in Rio was a success! We reviewed some composition techniques, and we are now learning about framing, emotion, exposure, motion, and telling a story with photos. I have been impressed with the improvement in photos in only three classes, and I’m sure that the students will continue to get better as they practice and learn. At first they were very interested in checking out the cameras, and taking a few photos…but now they are actually thinking about the photo that they want to make before doing it!  

Live from Times Square: World Perspective Day

We believe in the limitless possibilities of unity and understanding. In that spirit, we announced the first-ever #WorldPerspectiveDay in the middle of Times Square.

JOIN US ON MARCH 30TH FOR #WorldPerspectiveDay. LET'S CELEBRATE WHAT IT MEANS TO BE HUMAN, TOGETHER.

It will be a day recognized globally that celebrates diversely powerful perspectives shared around the world -- reminding us that we are all connected and part of the human family. See the world through someone else's eyes. 

 

Announcing World Perspective Day

We each have unique and powerful perspectives. What if we brought the world together for one day a year to celebrate what unites us as members of the human race? 

100cameras is so proud to announce World Perspective Day. We're inviting you, and everyone you know (!), to be an important part of the first-ever World Perspective Day on March 30, 2017.

Join us on March 30th by tagging #WorldPerspectiveDay, a globally recognized day inspired by our work with students in the field. 

To join the global narrative on march 30th:

  • Simply post an image that represents your perspective and how you view the world
  • Tag #WorldPerspectiveDay
  • Then, follow the hashtag to see life through someone else's eyes

Collection of images provided by 100cameras students, teammates, and friends of the organization.

Huge thanks to our launch partners:

We believe in the limitless possibilities of unity and understanding. Together, we invite the world to celebrate what it means to be human, together. 

The first annual World Perspective Day would not be possible without these partners:

photography tips for the holidays

New York City is already a naturally picturesque place. But add in the winter holidays, the most picturesque time of the year, and you’re guaranteed some spectacular photos.
Photo taken by Andrew, age 13, from Project002: New York City

Photo taken by Andrew, age 13, from Project002: New York City

And while locations like the ice skating rink at Rockefeller Center, the Empire State Building, and Radio City Music Hall are beautiful places to take holiday photos - they’re also a little overdone if you ask us locals. So if you, like us, live in New York (or are visiting soon) and are looking for something slightly out of the ordinary for capturing the essence of the Christmas season, get a little creative and check these out! 

Greenacre Park

Greenacre Park boasts a 25-foot waterfall that, even when frozen up during the winter, can be a perfect spot for some holiday photos. Set the scene by having your subject wear cozy sweaters and even some kitschy head gear if they’re up for it. Wrap some garland around your subjects, or lay it at their feet. You can turn any spot in New York into a perfect holiday photo location with the right attire and accessories.

Serendipity 3

Located on the Upper East Side, this quaint restaurant doesn’t mess around when it comes to decorating for Christmas. It already holds a cozy atmosphere, so naturally the string lights and garland gift it even more charm. Whether you’re recently engaged, have been married for a long time, or just have a special someone you’d like to have more pictures with, Serendipity is the best location for some sweet, romantic photos. 

Sixth Avenue

Chances are if you’ve been to the Radio City Music Hall during the holidays, you’ve seen the decorations on Sixth Avenue. If you haven’t, visiting this area is a must-do in order to get the perfect holiday pictures. The larger-than-life Christmas ornaments make for the perfect backdrop for family portraits.

Once you’ve snapped some photos around the giant decorations on Sixth Avenue, you might be compelled to pay a visit to the ice skating rink at Rockefeller Center. However, as any New Yorker knows, Rockefeller Center during the holidays can be a bit of a nightmare. Try heading about ten blocks south instead to shoot some photos at the less crowded Bryant Park ice skating rink.

Little Italy

If anyone knows how to do it big during the holidays, it’s the shop, restaurant, and home owners of the Little Italy district. Expect to see an abundance of windows and walls decked out with lights. Grab a bite to eat or a drink with your friend at the most festive restaurant you can find, take a seat outside, and have someone take some of what we like to call “purposefully candid” photos.

Lillies NYC

When decorating for the holidays, most restaurants will throw up a little garland here and some string lights there, but Lillie’s Victorian Establishment in Times Square goes all out. At this eatery, you’ll find decorations galore, which, when mixed with their already eclectic decor, makes for perfect photo ops.

Just make sure you’re in the know of indoor photo-taking techniques so your shots don’t end up too dark and blurry. If you’re shooting pictures of people inside of Lillie’s, try placing them near an open window or door to allow natural light into the photo. If you find that your photos are still coming out blurry even when placing your subject near a window, shoot in “P” (Program) mode and try increasing your ISO setting.

We hope you enjoy these holiday seasonal photo tips in the Big Apple, and we hope to see some of your images on social or perhaps even printed for your memory books. 

Ps, if you're ever photo-taking around west Chelsea, give us a ring as we would love to say hi!

Buy this product, & 100% goes to 100cameras

LUXI FOR ALL X 100CAMERAS

We're announcing today a campaign that makes money feel like it maybe-really-somehow does grow on trees! Thanks to the generosity and enthusiasm of the folks behind Luxi For All and Makers4Good,  100% of every purchase of the Luxi For All device will go towards furthering the mission of 100cameras. But that's not all! Every time a social media post is shared on facebook, instagram, or twitter -- $5.00 will be donated to help us empower more kids. We're quite excited about this. 

We geeked out over Luxi For All's device concept as we believe this to be a tool that will bring professional light meter reading skills to beginner and intermediate photographers everywhere --- helping with that long term goal to transition out of relying on the auto mode. To use your LFA, simply connect your device to your phone and sync it with the specially designed accompaniment app, and then just hold your new light meter in front of your subject of focus, and wahla! You will receive a calculated reading of the exact light settings needed to then manually plug into your camera.

With such a quick and easy process  -- along with a budget friendly price point and the convenience of being compact enough to travel anywhere -- the LFA helps you become light years more advanced than ever before. Pun intended. 

FOR EVERY LUXI PURCHASED THROUGH THIS LINK, 100% OF THE PURCHASE WILL HELP US empower more kids worldwide!

That's $30 going towards supporting our mission to empower kids to make tangible change through photography. You can purchase the device here for the length of the campaign until January 1, 2017. 

Follow us along on twitterfacebook, and instagram, and for every re-share of our campaign posts, Makers 4 Good will donate $5 to 100cameras up to $10,000.

SNAPSHOT PROJECT: ISTANBUL, TURKEY

100cameras is proud to announce our second beta Snapshot project, led by Snapshot leader Beatrice Schachenmayr in Istanbul, Turkey. We sat down with Beatrice to ask her all about her journey. Learn more about the project HERE, and read the story in her own words below.

"This photograph was taken on the Galata Bridge. It connects the old city of Sultanahmet to the new city, both considered to be on the “European side” of Istanbul. This was the class’ third trip outside and I noticed how they were sharing the cameras and their ideas. In the few months we’d been together, they’d grown more curious and comfortable exploring behind the lens." -- SPL Beatrice Schachenmayr

"This photograph was taken on the Galata Bridge. It connects the old city of Sultanahmet to the new city, both considered to be on the “European side” of Istanbul. This was the class’ third trip outside and I noticed how they were sharing the cameras and their ideas. In the few months we’d been together, they’d grown more curious and comfortable exploring behind the lens." -- SPL Beatrice Schachenmayr

Forty Syrian boys and girls attend my two classes”, Beatrice says. “Each week we talk about the meaning of taking pictures, we learn helpful camera techniques, and review photography vocab.

"Last class", she goes on, "I handed out the colorful pictures they’d taken of themselves and each other when they first used the blue cameras. They were filled with excitement and soon reached for scissors, glue sticks, and colored pencils as they began to collage in their journals. The week after next they will complete their portraits with words expressing their ambitions, feelings, and ideas."

In this photo, Beatrice is sitting with Ravan, age 13 and her younger sister Cuud, age 12. Both of these sweet girls can speak a little English, more than other students in the class. This was Beatrice's last outing with the kids and a nice time to really connect, braid hair, and relax at Emirgan Park.

In this photo, Beatrice is sitting with Ravan, age 13 and her younger sister Cuud, age 12. Both of these sweet girls can speak a little English, more than other students in the class. This was Beatrice's last outing with the kids and a nice time to really connect, braid hair, and relax at Emirgan Park.

One after the other they raise their hands and talk about their dreams: professional athlete, artist, blacksmith, lawyer, to name a few. These children are very excited about their future.

We sat down with Snapshot leader Beatrice to talk about her story, her motivation for undertaking this project of this magnitude, and the ups and downs of her incredible journey.

100cameras: How did you hear about 100cameras?

Beatrice: I first heard about 100cameras in 2012 while searching photography missions that would allow me to work with disadvantaged children. I had been interested in their volunteer opportunities and was becoming more and more interested in teaching photography skills to children out in the world but lacked the experience.

100cameras: Why are you drawn to teaching?

I was not always drawn to teaching; as a child I dreamt of becoming an artist. It wasn’t too long before I began spending my high school weekends instructing ski lessons and reading to kindergarteners at a local private school during the week. Once I entered college I began tutoring primary school students and after I graduated I spent six months teaching English in Thailand and volunteer teaching Indonesia. I realized my real passion for teaching when I connected well with students; creating a space where kids could enjoy learning really inspired me. It was then that I desired a way to combine my love of photography and literacy. 

100cameras: What is the most noteworthy part of this experience for you?

Beatrice: I just completed my first post on my project’s blog, http://frameyourstory.tumblr.com/. I wrote about my experiences with the refugee children so far in Istanbul. I also highlighted the fact that no matter how well you prepare yourself for a mission, whether it’s an exam or your life’s work, there will always obstacles to overcome. Every day has taught me how to make adjustments when plans change and that’s great practice for life. 

100cameras: What do you hope to accomplish with your Snapshot project?

Beatrice: To name a few, I hope that my Snapshot project - Frame Your Story will empower children to share their stories whether through photography or other forms of expression. I would love to see the kids set goals for themselves when thinking about their future. Maybe one day they will look back on this experience and it will bring them self-confidence and a smile.

100cameras: Why did you choose the organization/community you've been working with?

Beatrice: As a student abroad in Istanbul, Turkey in 2012, I had a life changing opportunity to work with ASAM, the Association for Solidarity with Asylum-Seekers and Migrants, a non-profit organization that focuses on “developing solutions to the challenges that refugees and asylum seekers encounter in Turkey and to support them in meeting their basic and social needs.” It was this opportunity that really opened my eyes to the harsh daily struggles that refugee youth face all over the world. Now, three years later I’m interested in learning more about how this multi-cultural city is changing and I’d like to use my talents to help alleviate some of the suffering refugee children are facing. I think photography is a wonderful way of doing that.

100cameras: Do you have any recommendations, comments, or advice for future Snapshot leaders?

Beatrice: Be ready to put your whole heart into it. Also, accept that your project will probably not go as planned and that’s okay because you’ll learn how to adjust your outline, lessons and your daily routine. Good luck!

Stay tuned as we open Snapshot applications in the coming week. We look forward to hearing where you're most passionate about!

Snapshot Project: Istanbul, Turkey 2016

Snapshot Project: Istanbul, Turkey 2016

Watch As 100cameras Gives TEDx Talk

It was an amazing opportunity for 100cameras and our co-founder, Angela Popplewell, to have been invited to speak at TEDx in Seattle.

Angela's TEDx talk focused on changing perspectives and choosing to be shaped by the bright moments in life. Choosing hope, choosing joy, choosing gratefulness- traits we learn from each and every one of the kids who have become a part of our lives. Our students have taught us and challenged us to see the life-altering power of perspective, and we'll never be the same. 

Watch the talk here, be inspired, and please share the link along!

Lenny Kravitz & Leica Galleries donate $25,000

Big announcement! The Leica Galleries, Lenny Kravitz, Reiner Opoku and the Oslicht Gallery donated all profits from the Lenny Kravitz- FLASH exhibit held during Art Basel 2015 to 100cameras.

The FLASH exhibit included a selection of 50 photographs taken by Lenny Kravitz with his Leica, pictured here:

We’re very proud that the proceeds from ‘FLASH’ will be able to support the mission of 100Cameras. Our longtime passion for art and photography is at the core of everything we do. We’re thrilled that we’re able to help fuel this passion in children throughout the world and support an experience that allows them to grow and give back in a meaningful way.
— Karin Rehn-Kaufmann, Chief Representative Leica Galleries International

100cameras is honored to accept this donation of $25,000, which will help support our next international project, Project006, and our Snapshot Project platform. Thank you to Lenny, Leica Cameras USA and everyone involved for supporting our mission to give photography and change a community. Our goal is to reach more youth across the globe and to create sustainable impact by empowering them to continue the cycle of positive change.

We hope you and your friends will follow along on our journey!

Snapshot Project: Thailand

behind the scenes with snapshot project leader, becky lee
Snapshot Thailand 2016

Snapshot Thailand 2016

My name is Becky and this past January, my sister Charlotte, my brother Henry, and I spent a month teaching photography to students at Schools of Hope (SOH) in Chiang Dao and Chiang Mai, Thailand in collaboration with 100cameras. 

SOH is based in Chiang Dao, a district about 2 hours north of Chiang Mai in Thailand, bordering Myanmar. Over 60 children ages 7-17 live at Schools of Hope. Most of the students are displaced from their families, so Schools of Hope is not just a school, but a home. Once, we asked an older boy if he had any brothers or sisters. He looked at the group of kids running around, laughed, and said, "I have a lot of them!"

The children study subjects like math, English, geography, science, and history in addition to local culture and optional vocational training in farming, mechanics, and environmental studies. Some are also in training to become Buddhist monks.

When Charlotte proposed the project to the director of the school, he was so thrilled. He said that in Thailand, arts education is often only for rich children. Part of the purpose of this program is to remind the students (and ourselves) that photography, and art, is for all. The director does the best he can with limited resources to see that the students at the school get every opportunity to succeed.

On our first day of class, we were led through the Schools of Hope campus, past the temple and dormitories (and roosters!) to a set of stairs. We took off our shoes and walked up to an open air treehouse where the photography classes would be held.

WE HAD PREPARED FOR AROUND 20 STUDENTS SO WHEN MORE THAN TWICE AS MANY SMILING FACES WERE EAGERLY AWAITING, IT WAS AN UNEXPECTED, YET WELCOME, SURPRISE. TIME FOR AN ICEBREAKER!

After some quick thinking, we split the big group up into three stations. At the first station, I introduced the mission of 100cameras - to provide kids with the tools to share their perspectives through photography and empower them to support their own communities. We looked at student photography from previous 100cameras projects in South Sudan, New York City, Cuba, and India as shown on the 100cameras website. 

WITH EVERY PHOTO, OUR STUDENTS GOT A TASTE OF WHAT LIFE IS LIKE FOR OTHER CHILDREN ALL OVER THE WORLD AND BEGAN TO THINK ABOUT THE STORIES THEY WANTED TO TELL ABOUT NORTHERN THAILAND. 

Writing exercises, Snapshot Thailand 2016

Writing exercises, Snapshot Thailand 2016

Using the 100cameras Snapshot curriculum, we explored photography techniques such as exposure, composition, shutter speed, aperture, color, and storytelling. We talked about which pictures we liked, and why, and how different techniques can create different moods and emotions. I made sure to share my favorite piece of photography advice - techniques are tools, not rules, and the "best" picture is the one that you like the most.

Henry's station focused on personal development and storytelling skills. The students drew storyboards reflecting on favorite memories, current passions, and future goals. His group also learned about descriptive and abstract language and practiced writing titles and captions to add context to their photos.

Charlotte's station was everyone's favorite - the Photo Station! At the Photo Station, students were given donated cameras and 30 minutes to take pictures and practice photography techniques. We gave out some prompts like "take a picture that makes you laugh" or "look up!" to get the creative juices flowing, but quickly realized that each student had his or her own style. Some students liked taking animal portraits while others preferred nature shots and landscape photography.

At the end of every class, we showed a slideshow of photos from that day. Seeing the kids' faces light up when one of their photos appeared on the big screen was our favorite part - the mix of pride, excitement, a little embarrassment, and the realization of hey, maybe I am a real photographer!

Hoping to magnify that feeling of accomplishment, we planned a full-scale photography exhibit at Thapae East, a local venue known for hosting creative events in its outdoor space, complete with an artsy, minimalist backdrop of bright red crossbeams. We transformed the space into an outdoor art gallery and invited friends, family, and the Chiang Mai community to enjoy a night of photography complete with live music and traditional Shan food and dance.

The event was a great success and really fun for the students and teachers alike but our work isn't over yet! Part of the 100cameras model is to help kids realize that they have the power to support their own community, in part through the sales of their artwork. 

Snapshot Thailand 2016

Snapshot Thailand 2016

WE CAN HONESTLY SAY THAT THESE ARE SPECIAL KIDS, SOME OF THE MOST RESPECTFUL, HARD-WORKING, AND THOUGHTFUL CHILDREN WE HAVE EVER ENCOUNTERED. WE HAVE NO DOUBT THAT THEY WILL GO FAR AND HOPE THAT PHOTOGRAPHY CAN BE AN OUTLET FOR THEM ALONG THE WAY.

Based on updated needs from Schools of Hope, 40% of funds will go toward new dormitory roofs to repair water damage and 60% will go toward a 60-day summer course for 1,500 students (!) in 20 remote villages to learn about their cultural heritage in addition to mathematics, traditional languages, literature, and community-based skills.

*Photos of the classes were taken by the hugely talented and dedicated photographer Jittrapon Kaicome who volunteered his time, expertise, and Thai translation services to the program.  

 

 

100cameras Supporter Feature: Tony Cicero

Meet Tony, photographer and supporter of 100cameras. Tony has generously pledged to donate a portion of his photography sales proceeds to the 100cameras mission. We sat down with Tony to talk beginnings, inspiration and how he feels about teaching young kids the art of photo.

Q: How did you first become involved with photography?

A: I was introduced to photography at a young age, at approximately eight years old. My older brother was a photographer who worked at Kodak as a chemical engineer. Through this I was immersed in the world of cameras, different film types, photo papers and the full darkroom developing process. I still have my very first Kodak Hawkeye Pocket C110 Instamatic.

Q: Sounds like it was meant to be! What does storytelling mean to you?

A: To me storytelling is the ability to communicate directly to anyone who views my photos my interpretation of what happened or even what may have happened. I always try to portray an obvious story in my photos and some piece of mystery.

Q: In your opinion, what is the most powerful or intriguing part of telling your story through photography?

A: The most powerful aspect of storytelling for me with my camera is that I like to leave the viewer with a thought of what I was thinking when I snapped the shutter. I try to somehow convey my views in the photo through composition, lighting and various points of views and angles.

Q: Why do you identify with the 100cameras mission?

A: It is very important to gives children the tools and a platform to share their photos with the world because without this chance, many kids would not ever discover the talents they possess. I was lucky enough to have such tools and found that this make all the difference in building your confidence when you are just starting out.

Q: How did you learn about 100cameras? 

A: I discovered 100cameras.org while searching for charities that teach photography to children. This was an area that I had some interest in for quite some time and once I found the 100cameras.org site; I was convinced this was just the type of organization I wanted to be a part of.

Q: Anything else our audience should know?

A: I just want everyone to know that I really enjoy taking photos and I hope that they make a change in someone’s life.

We do, too! Check out Tony's work here. If you know a photographer who might like to support us in this way, drop us a line. 

Chasing Light: Camera Tips from our Photography Educator

learn how to chase light & how to chase it well. 

Photographing sunsets is no walk in the park, but when done correctly, you can produce some awe-inducing shots. All it truly takes to capture sunsets is the willingness to spend some time getting to know your camera (and the weather!).

Written by JP Pullos, our Photography Educator, who directly teaches the power of photography to our students worldwide and is also the mastermind behind our custom curriculum's photography toolbelt.  Our curriculum not only teaches kids how to use a camera, but it is designed to teach them the importance of their unique perspective.

SEE OUR THREE EASY STEPS BELOW

Image taken by 100cameras Staff during Project004: India. 

Image taken by 100cameras Staff during Project004: India. 

PATIENCE IS Always the VIRTUE. 

If you’re wanting a phenomenal sunset picture, hang around your chosen spot for a little while. As the sun continues to fade downwards, the sky will continue to change through a myriad of colors, providing you with a variety of shots. 

Whenever you think you're done, I suggest to wait even a few more minutes. Shots at dusk can be just as beautiful, if not more than, sunset shots. Just make sure you’re at least somewhat knowledgeable about night photography.

Image taken by 100cameras student photographer, Eduardo, during Project003: Cuba.  

Image taken by 100cameras student photographer, Eduardo, during Project003: Cuba.  

EVERY IMAGE NEEDS YOUR FOCUS. 

Including a point of focus in your photo will help give it a unique and interesting touch. If you’re on the beach, find a tree to place in the forefront. Or if you’re in the city, an exceptional looking building will add a captivating touch. 

Another way to spin the focus, is to bring along a friend (we like photography with friends). You can either create a silhouette by decreasing the exposure (see instructions below) or you can pop your flash up to get a properly exposed person AND a properly exposed sunset. 

100cameras student photographer, Aries, plays with lighting during sunset on the Williamsburg Bridge during Project002: NYC. 

100cameras student photographer, Aries, plays with lighting during sunset on the Williamsburg Bridge during Project002: NYC. 

NEVER STOP EXPERIMENTING. 

When working with our students in the field, white balance is a function on the camera that we don’t typically cover until one of our later classes in the curriculum. And as a general rule of thumb, we recommend to let the camera do the work around white balance. With sunsets, however, the white balance setting is something that can be interesting to play around with.

The white balance setting exists on your camera because all light sources have a particular kind of color cast – most often on a spectrum from really orange to really blue. Tungsten and Incandescent light bulbs tend to let off a really orangey light whereas the light caused by shade (or really indirect sunlight) is really blue. Playing with the white balance setting when you’re taking pictures of sunsets can be a fast and easy way to either warm up your image (increase the orange in the image) or cool it down (increase the blue in the image).

To see what this looks like, find your white balance setting and shoot one image of a sunset on the tungsten or incandescent setting and then shoot the same sunset but change the white balance setting to shade (or, if you don’t have shade, use cloudy). You’ll see quite a difference! Once you see those two results, you can then toy around with the various white balance options on your camera that will get you exactly the result you like.


WANT TO LEARN directly FROM JP & SUPPORT 100CAMERAS? 

JP, also of the highly successful JP Teaches Photo, has partnered with 100cameras to bring to you photography tips and a night of fun with the Brooklyn Nets, with proceeds benefiting 100cameras. See more below! 

JP having fun teaching photography to our students during Project004: India. 

JP having fun teaching photography to our students during Project004: India. 

Join JP and JP Teaches Photo for a two hour photography class at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, NY, on Saturday, March 26 and learn everything you need to know about taking great photos with your camera. Not to mention - get the breathtaking stadium shots you've always wanted. After a short break, all participants are invited back to watch the Brooklyn Nets take on the Indiana Pacers. What could be better?

BONUS: For this one night only, students who participate in the class will be given special permission to use their professional camera to take shots inside of Barclays during the game. Access like this is usually prohibited, making this truly a one-of-a-kind opportunity.

$10 from every ticket purchased will go towards the 100cameras mission to give photography and change a community. Sign up before tickets sell out!

Announcing our Snapshot Project Platform

host your own 100cameras project in a community you care about

Over the years we have received hundreds of inquiries from photographers, teachers, and leaders from around the world asking to bring 100cameras to their own communities. While it has always been our dream to equip as many kids as possible to learn that their stories matter, we have also been working hard to create something that goes beyond us to empower you, too!

Our Snapshot Project Platform is a custom-built model of our very own curriculum that equips passionate people like you to empower kids worldwide. We’re putting the opportunity directly into your hands to live, breathe, and thrive in leading a project in a community you are committed to.

We currently have Snapshots running in Turkey, Thailand, Nepal, and Los Angeles - four projects and four chances for you to meet new students, purchase new prints, and help empower kids across the globe. And we're excited to introduce each one those with you throughout this spring and summer. 

Photo taken during our Snapshot project in Chiang Mai, Thailand led by Becky Lee.

Photo taken during our Snapshot project in Chiang Mai, Thailand led by Becky Lee.

We'll be opening up applications for our next round of beta Snapshot Projects this summer. If you are interested in applying to become a Snapshot Project Leader, follow us @100cameras to receive real time updates on the status of the application release.

What we celebrate (Bring on the confetti)

The power of perspective

Our co-founder, Angela Francine Popplewell, sat down with The Confetti Project to answer one simple question: what do you celebrate?

On celebrating 100cameras - "It’s beautiful", she says, "because what we celebrate in our work is the power of perspective and that perspective is different for every individual human being, for every individual culture all across the world. We are all functioning in this shared space together and really celebrating the differences, but also the similarities.

In these student’s images, you see their celebratory hearts in it. Their three hour walks to water in Sudan, you see that they’re still kids and grateful in that moment and that’s what they portray in their images. In that, it frees me in a way that I respond to that and I celebrate that with them."

Photography Night with the Brooklyn Nets

The Brooklyn Nets team up with JP Teaches Photo to support 100cameras
Image via @barclayscenter, shot by @natlyphoto.

Image via @barclayscenter, shot by @natlyphoto.

Big things are happening within the 100cameras community.

Calling all New Yorkers! Do you like photography and basketball? We've got you covered. Our friends & collaborators at JP Teaches Photo are teaching a two hour photography class at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, NY, on Saturday, March 26.

Come learn everything you need to know about taking great photos with your camera, AND get the breathtaking stadium shots you've always wanted. After a short break post the class, all participants will come back to watch the Brooklyn Nets take on the Indiana Pacers. What could be better?

And as a bonus: For this one night only, students who participate in the class will be given special permission to use their professional camera to take shots inside of Barclays during the game. Access like this is usually prohibited, making this truly a one-of-a-kind opportunity. 

Our favorite part is that $10 from every ticket purchased will go towards the 100cameras mission to give photography and change a community. Sign up before tickets sell out!